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by Antality Jewelry May 31, 2021 2 min read

Have you ever looked at someone and wondered why they are wearing so much or such less jewelry? Well, do you think you do it better than them?

Uh, maybe not. But don't worry, I'll guide you through some tips to perfectly accessorize yourself for every outfit, and you would know how much jewelry is too much? Let's not waste any more time and dig in.

1. Two Only

Let's start with the basics first. The first rule of carrying jewelry is not wearing too much. Always keep the law of two in your mind.

This means wearing just two pieces of different jewelry simultaneously; for example, if you are wearing a necklace and a bracelet, you don't have to put on matching earrings and rings.

No matter how delicate all these pieces are, it's better to let your superficial and jewelry make a drastic statement rather than lathering yourself up with layers.

 


2. Let One Piece Be the Winner


This is something not many people would know about, but it's equally essential than everything else. Whenever you are deciding to wear something funky, something bold, then let that piece outshine others.


For example, if you are wearing large dangling bangles and rings, wear subtle earnings or a very subtle necklace. Let your bracelet bring your look together.


3. Don't Let People Play Odd One Out on You


You decide to wear all rose gold today on your wrist; it's a personal favorite, but so is silver.

This doesn't mean that you will wear five bangles of rose gold and put in a single silver because you love it. This disrupts the whole jewelry look, and it looks absurd, no matter how beautiful the pieces are.



Make sure to pick one metal or pair them up equally, don't mix them in an abnormal proportion, or you would end up catching all the attention but in a negative way.


4. Left or Right?


If you are planning on wearing something heavy and bold, anklets or bracelets, pick one side. Don't, and I repeat, don't make the mistake of fully stacking up both of your hands with colors and funk.


Always keep a balance like throwing a watch or something light on the empty arm for an equalizer but never make yourself look like a bracelet or anklet stand.


5. Tarnished is Not Rusted


Oh boy! I have seen people wear tarnished jewelry saying they are rusted; no, tarnished looks damaged and degraded.


Sure, antique and rusted jewelry are beautiful, but it's composed like that on purpose, and it looks great with the look, but it's not the same as damaged jewelry.

It's not like you remember your favorite ring in your purse after months. You pull it out, and it's tarnished buy you still wear it thinking it's making a statement.

NO, people do notice, and the difference can be seen. Throw them away if they can't be revived or keep them as a memorial but don't wear them.


Conclusion


Yeah, you can thank me later for putting you out of the" what jewelry to wear?" misery. Till then, get into your jewelry box and get some cleaning done for a better selection.



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